IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 543: The Marches of Britain and Ireland, 1100-1400, I: Landscape and Geography

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Medieval & Early Modern Research Initiative, Cardiff University / Welsh Chronicles Research Group, Bangor University
Organisers:Georgia Henley, Department of English / Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis, Stanford University
Victoria Shirley, School of English, Communication & Philosophy, Cardiff University
Moderator/Chair:Georgia Henley, Department of English / Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis, Stanford University
Paper 543-aFluvial Epistemologies in Gerald of Wales
(Language: English)
Coral Lumbley, Faculty of Arts & Science New York University
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Latin, Local History
Paper 543-bThe Second Noble River of Britain: The River Severn and the Anglo-Welsh Border in 12th-Century Historiography
(Language: English)
Victoria Shirley, School of English, Communication & Philosophy, Cardiff University
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Latin, Local History
Paper 543-cWaste: The Final Frontier? - Conceptualising the Space of the Irish Marches and the Lands beyond Them in the 13th Century
(Language: English)
Eoghan Keane, Medieval History Research Centre, Trinity College Dublin
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Local History
Abstract

This session is the first of four comparative sessions on the Marches of Britain and Ireland. The first session in this strand will address constructions of place and space and the political geography of the Marches. The first paper will examine how Gerald of Wales uses watery events, natural and supernatural, to process conflicts in the south-eastern Marcher regions. The second paper will analyse the mythical, historical, and geographical significance of the River Severn and the Anglo-Welsh border in the works of Geoffrey of Monmouth, William of Malmesbury, and Gerald of Wales. The final paper will compare the contrasting descriptions of Irish ‘wastes’ as valuable economic wastes and lands in the Irish marches lying waste and unprofitable due to the ravages of war.