IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 551: Dis/Ability in the Medieval North, I

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Disability before Disability, University of Iceland, Reykjavík / Icelandic Research Fund
Organisers:Chris Crocker, Faculty of Icelandic & Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Iceland, Reykjavík
Yoav Tirosh, Faculty of Icelandic & Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Iceland, Reykjavík
Moderator/Chair:Ninon Dubourg, Laboratoire Identités Cultures et Territoires (ICT), Université Diderot Paris 7
Paper 551-aDisability before Disability in the Medieval Icelandic Sagas: Methodological Considerations
(Language: English)
Chris Crocker, Faculty of Icelandic & Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Iceland, Reykjavík
Yoav Tirosh, Faculty of Icelandic & Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Iceland, Reykjavík
Index terms: Daily Life, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Mentalities, Social History
Paper 551-bDependency or Authority? Disability or Ability?: Care Givers and Receivers in Old English and Anglo-Latin Sources
(Language: English)
Marit Ronen, Department of History, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Index terms: Daily Life, Language and Literature - Old English, Social History
Paper 551-cHearing Loss in Medieval Iceland: The Palaeopathology of a Hidden Disability
(Language: English)
Cecilia Collins, Independent Scholar Hamburg
Index terms: Anthropology, Archaeology - General, Medicine
Abstract

These sessions explore disability in the medieval North as a multi-factorial phenomenon. They make use of the concepts of ’embodied difference’ and/or ‘marked or atypical bodies’ as they do not imply pre-defined notions of disability. The body is seen as something that materialises and translates physical, psychic, and intellectual differences in ways that societies identify them as deviations from what is considered ‘normal’ and/or ‘able-bodied’ in specific cultural and/or social contexts. Within this framework, the papers deal with archaeological, literary, and historical evidence, and engage with methodological challenges involved in researching disability, and accordingly also ability, in the Middle Ages.