IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 552: Memorialising the Middle Ages: Public Monuments and Modern Appropriations of the Medieval Past

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University / Centre for Historiography & Historical Culture, Aberystwyth University
Organiser:Simon A. John, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Moderator/Chair:Björn Weiler, Department of History & Welsh History, Aberystwyth University
Paper 552-a'Nothing short of a national disgrace': The Llywelyn Memorial Committee, Nationalism, and the Medieval Past
(Language: English)
Kathryn Hurlock, Department of History- Politics and Philosophy- Manchester Metropolitan University
Index terms: Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Mentalities
Paper 552-bA Crusader Duel at the (Crystal) Palace: The Statues of Godfrey of Bouillon and Richard the Lionheart at the Great Exhibition of 1851
(Language: English)
Simon A. John, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Index terms: Art History - Sculpture, Crusades, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Mentalities
Paper 552-cMemorialising an Imagined Middle Ages at the Monastery of Saint-Évroult-Notre-Dame-du-Bois, Normandy, c. 1890-1912
(Language: English)
Charlie Rozier, Durham University Institute for Medieval and Early Modern Studies
Index terms: Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Mentalities, Monasticism
Abstract

The three papers in this session investigate the creation in the modern era of monuments, memorials and statues invoking medieval history. Using case studies drawn from the 19th and early 20th centuries, and encompassing projects originating in Wales, England, Belgium and northern France, these papers will offer new insights into the ways in which monuments created in the century before the outbreak of WWI sought to harness sources, traditions, and figures from the Middle Ages, and present them according to contemporary preoccupations. In doing so, these papers will engage with current debates in medievalism and contribute to live discussions in memory studies, material culture, and the socio-political functions of monuments today.