IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 615: 14th-Century Italy and England: Dialogue beyond Borders

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Leeds Centre for Dante Studies / Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Organiser:Charles Roe, School of English, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Elisabeth Trischler, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 615-aAugustine's De civitate Dei as 'Border' between Vergil and Dante
(Language: English)
Vincenzo Vitale, Istituto di Italianistica Universität Basel
Index terms: Language and Literature - Italian, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Theology
Paper 615-bBankers to the Crown: Anglo-Italian Linguistic Contact in the 14th Century
(Language: English)
Luigi Alessandro Cappelletti, Studi Litterari e Linguistici Italiani ed Europei Università degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale
Index terms: Daily Life, Economics - Urban, Language and Literature - Middle English, Language and Literature - Italian
Paper 615-cChaucer's 'Bella Scola': Dante's Inferno IV versus House of Fame III
(Language: English)
Shachar Livne, Department of General & Comparative Literature Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Language and Literature - Italian, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 615-dPoetic Licence from Italy to England
(Language: English)
Charles Roe, School of English, University of Leeds
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Language and Literature - Italian, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Abstract

It is well known that writers in 14th-century Italy and England sought dialogues beyond the borders of time and space. Dante’s encounter with Virgil may be the most celebrated of these, but it is ringed by encounters between Dante and Petrarch, Petrarch and Boccaccio, Dante and Boccaccio, Chaucer and each of the above, and the anonymous Pearl-poet and Dante. All of these echo a wider search for conversations with the authors of classical antiquity. This strand seeks to explore the border over which such dialogues are held. On what terms do these writers meet one another? How private can their conversations be? Which borders prove more stubborn than others? How far can dialogue between such individuated writers differ from more common streams of influence in medieval writing?