IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 617: Historical Writing and Crusade Texts: Narrativity, Intertextuality, and Tradition

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Medieval & Early Modern Centre, University of Sydney
Organiser:Stephen Spencer, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Moderator/Chair:Andrew T. Jotischky, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Paper 617-aAlbert of Aachen, the Gesta Francorum, and the Fall of Antioch: The Independence of Albert's Historia Ierosolimitana Reconsidered
(Language: English)
Stephen Spencer, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Index terms: Crusades, Language and Literature - Latin, Rhetoric
Paper 617-b'A swiĆ°e mycel styrung': The First Crusade in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and Other Annalistic Texts from Early 12th-Century England
(Language: English)
James Henry Kane, Medieval & Early Modern Centre, University of Sydney
Index terms: Crusades, Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Latin, Rhetoric
Paper 617-cNarrativising the Third Crusade: Richard the Lionheart, the True Cross, and the Problem of Failure
(Language: English)
Katherine Mortimer, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Index terms: Crusades, Language and Literature - Latin, Rhetoric
Abstract

In recent years, the diverse western sources for the crusades have received fresh scrutiny, with much of this work demonstrating the value of utilising different methodological frameworks, such as narrative theory, to interrogate the texts and of examining these sources in the broader context of historical writing across Europe. The papers in this session reflect, and seek to contribute to, this historiographical turn by exploring the potential intertextuality of two accounts of the First Crusade usually considered independent; the development of traditions about that expedition in neglected annalistic texts from early 12th-century England; and the textual significance and reception of an often-overlooked episode, Richard I’s supposed discovery of a fragment of the True Cross, in narratives of the Third Crusade.