IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 622: Borders in Medievalism and Historiography in the North?

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Ralf Palmgren, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture & Art Studies, University of Helsinki
Moderator/Chair:Ralf Palmgren, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture & Art Studies, University of Helsinki
Paper 622-aNordic Medieval Scholars and the Project of a Medieval Encyclopedia in the 20th Century: Postwar Nordism in Practice?
(Language: English)
Eva Maria Ahl-Waris, Department of History, University of Helsinki
Index terms: Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Teaching the Middle Ages
Paper 622-bThe Ideological Borders between Unnecessary, Sufficient, and Advanced Knowledge: Guidelines for Teaching the Nordic Middle Ages at German Schools until 1945
(Language: English)
Michael Irlenbusch-Reynard, Abteilung für Skandinavische Sprachen und Literaturen, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn
Index terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Teaching the Middle Ages
Paper 622-cIndigeneity in the Construction of Medieval Scandinavia in the Kulturhistorisk leksikon for nordisk middelalder and Wikipedia
(Language: English)
Alaric Hall, Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki
Index terms: Anthropology, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Abstract

This session examines how the Nordic Middle Ages have been deployed in constructing identity over the last century. Paper -a investigates the influence of the Finnish editors in the inter-Scandinavian cultural-historical Kulturhistorisk leksikon for nordisk middelalder (KNLM) encyclopedia project (1956-1978). It links the politics and mentalities of the project to postwar so-called Nordism. Paper -b studies how German school curricula drew ideological borders to distinguish ‘useful’ from ‘unnecessary’ and ‘instructive’ from ‘idle’ knowledge of the Nordic Middle Ages. Paper -c compares the representation of medieval Finnic- and Sámi-speaking cultures in KNLM and Wikipedia in order to track how Nordic cultures are representing indigeneity.