IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 722: The Borders of Universal History

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Values of French Language & Literature in the European Middle Ages
Organiser:Henry Ravenhall, Department of French King's College London
Moderator/Chair:Matthew Siôn Lampitt, Faculty of Modern & Medieval Languages & Linguistics/ St John's College University of Cambridge
Paper 722-aRenegotiating the Border between Secular and Sacred in the Manuscripts of the Histoire ancienne jusqu'à César
(Language: English)
Henry Ravenhall, Department of French King's College London
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 722-bThe Borders of the Author's Land: The Domain of 'Authenticity' in Medieval Vernacular Historical Narratives, From the Histoire ancienne jusqu'à César Backwards
(Language: English)
Maria Teresa Rachetta, Department of French King's College London
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 722-cFrontiers of Time and Place: Geographical Understanding in and of the Histoire ancienne jusqu'à César and Its Manuscript Tradition
(Language: English)
Hannah Morcos, Department of French King's College London
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Universal histories, despite being the dominant mode through which medieval audiences engaged with the past, remain understudied by literary critics. This panel, organised by the ERC-funded project ‘The Values of French’ (2015-20), takes the Histoire ancienne jusqu’à César as a case study to explore various types of border: its vast manuscript tradition not only traverses Europe and the Mediterranean, a journey reflected in the narrative itself, but also raises questions about the borderline categories scholars employ to interrogate medieval texts (‘historical’ and ‘literary’, ‘truth’ and ‘fiction’, ‘authority’, ‘authenticity’, ‘secular’ and ‘sacred’).