IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 754: Translating Back: Vernacular Sources and Prestige-Language Adaptations

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 14.15-15.45

Organiser:Alexandra Reider, Department of English, Yale University
Moderator/Chair:Marian Homans-Turnbull, Department of English, University of California, Berkeley
Paper 754-aTranslating up or down?: The Catalan Text of the 'Revelations' of Constance de Rabastens
(Language: English)
Catherine E. Léglu, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Language and Literature - Latin, Language and Literature - Spanish or Portuguese
Paper 754-bStimulus Conscientiae: From Vernacular Verse to Latin Prose
(Language: English)
Clara Wild, Medieval Studies, Yale University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Middle English, Language and Literature - Latin, Lay Piety
Paper 754-cWelsh and Latin in the St Asaph Manuscripts
(Language: English)
David Callander, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Language and Literature - Celtic, Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 754-dAcrobatic Arabics: Low and High Language in Al-Suyuti's Anthology of Women's Poetry, Nuzhat al-julasā' fī ashʻār al-nisā'
(Language: English)
Rebecca Hill, Department of English, University of California, Los Angeles
Index terms: Islamic and Arabic Studies, Language and Literature - Comparative, Women's Studies
Abstract

Multilingual cultures develop complex practices – and theories – of translation. Many scholarly treatments of medieval translation account primarily for translation from Latin into a local vernacular and/or from (what has traditionally been understood as) a high-prestige vernacular into a lower-prestige vernacular. This panel is interested in exploring and theorizing translation that moves in the other direction: translations and other direct adaptations from any medieval vernacular, local language, or dialect into a ‘lingua franca’. The papers on this panel consider translation from and between Welsh, Arabic, Occitan, Catalan, English, and Latin.