IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 812: At the Borders of Genres, IV: Articulating Perceptions of the Past in the Carolingian and Post-Carolingian World in Northern France and Germany

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen / Princeton University / Instituto de Estudios Medievals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Organiser:Helmut Reimitz, Department of History, Princeton University
Moderator/Chair:Matthias Martin Tischler, Institut d'Estudis Medievals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Paper 812-aDivergent Legacies: The Making and Remaking of Carolingian History Books from the 9th to the 12th Centuries
(Language: English)
Helmut Reimitz, Department of History, Princeton University
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 812-bIt's Better to Burn Out Than to Fade Away?: Regino of Prüm on Historical Change
(Language: English)
Felix Schaefer, Sonderforschungsbereich 923 'Bedrohte Ordnungen', Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 812-cFrom Nuptial Song to History: Radbert's 9th-Century Epitaphs for Adalhard and Wala of Corbie, Two Centuries Later
(Language: English)
Mayke de Jong, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

In this session we will continue to look at the changes in regard to the writing and the forms of historical works in Northern France and Germany. Helmut Reimitz will study these changes in the transmission and transformation of Carolingian history books. Felix Schaefer will continue with Regino of Prüm’s chronicle and discuss how Regino reflects upon historical change itself and how the chronicle’s own historiographical logic forms the crossroads between late and post-Carolingian times. Mayke de Jong will explore the Life of Paschasius Radbertus’ composed in Corbie sometime after 1073 and compare it with its source, the Vita Adalhardi II. What had to go, what could stay, and why? Exploring these questions means confronting the very different priorities of the authors involved, with two centuries in between.