IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 819: Glass Networks: Tracing Early Medieval Long-Distance Trade, c. 800-1000

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Leverhulme Trust Project 'Glass Networks: Tracing Early Medieval Long-Distance Trade, c. AD 800-1000'
Organiser:Hajnalka Herold, Vienna Institute of Archaeological Science, Universit├Ąt Wien
Moderator/Chair:Sam Turner, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, Newcastle University
Paper 819-aThe Glass Networks Project: Background, Research Questions, and Main Results
(Language: English)
Hajnalka Herold, Vienna Institute of Archaeological Science, Universit├Ąt Wien
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - General, Economics - Trade, Science
Paper 819-bCompositional Groups and Their Interpretation in Early Medieval Glass
(Language: English)
Andrew Shortland, Cranfield Forensic Institute Cranfield University
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - General, Economics - Trade, Science
Paper 819-cThe Geodatabase for the Glass Networks Project: Spatial Distribution of 8th- and 9th-Century Mosaic Eye Beads in Europe and Beyond
(Language: English)
Szabina Merva, Department of Archaeology University of Exeter
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - General, Economics - Trade, Science
Abstract

This session presents the ‘Glass Networks: Tracing Early Medieval Long-Distance Trade, c. 800-1000’ Leverhulme-funded project. The project analyses early medieval glass beads with chemical and archaeological methods, in order to develop a novel perspective on European long-distance trade networks and interconnectedness. Early medieval raw glass production mainly took place in Mediterranean and Near Eastern centres. Each produced glass with distinct chemical compositions, which was circulated to various regions, including Europe. Small-scale raw glass production also existed in north-western Europe. While the study of glass in the Mediterranean has received considerable attention, the potential of glass circulation networks to transform our understanding of trade and communication routes in Europe has yet to be fully utilised.