IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 822: The Borders between Myth and History: Comparative Reflections on Medieval Historiography

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Institutt for arkeologi, historie, kultur- og religionsvitenskap, Universitetet i Bergen / Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge
Organiser:Nick Pouls, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Moderator/Chair:Nick Pouls, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Paper 822-aThe Curious Myth of the Free Norse Women in Late Scandinavian Enlightenment Historiography
(Language: English)
Peter Hatlebakk, Institutt for arkeologi historie kultur- og religionsvitskap Universitetet i Bergen
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Women's Studies
Paper 822-bMythologisation, Demythologisation, Remythologisation
(Language: English)
Peter Burke, Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Mentalities
Abstract

To construct a historical narrative on medieval history is a complex process. Historians need to face various challenges as medieval historiography generates certain didactic topics, such as a belief in divine providence, the acceptance of certain myths, politics, and the religious power of the Church. This session aims to reflect on the ‘borders’ between ‘myth’ and ‘history’ in medieval historiography by presenting a comparative discussion in scholarly traditions for a diachronic and synchronic perspective. What is the relationship between myth and history? Which ‘borders’ exists in medieval historiography, and to what extent do we still recount medieval myth as history? How do historians reflect on this ‘borderland’ while writing a history of the Middle Ages? Which different approaches and methodologies can be applied?