IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 843: The Marches of Britain and Ireland, 1100-1400, IV: Identity

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Medieval & Early Modern Research Initiative, Cardiff University / Welsh Chronicles Research Group, Bangor University
Organisers:Georgia Henley, Department of English / Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis, Stanford University
Victoria Shirley, School of English, Communication & Philosophy, Cardiff University
Moderator/Chair:Victoria Shirley, School of English, Communication & Philosophy, Cardiff University
Paper 843-aMemory and Materiality on the Medieval March of Wales
(Language: English)
Georgia Henley, Department of English / Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis, Stanford University
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Historiography - Medieval, Local History
Paper 843-bWelsh, English, and Norman: Identity, Image, and Perception in Medieval South-East Wales
(Language: English)
Thomas Lee Davies, School of History Philosophy & Social Sciences Bangor University
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Heraldry, Language and Literature - Comparative
Paper 843-cHybrid Identities: Bilingual Poetry on the March of Wales
(Language: English)
Helen Fulton, Department of English, University of Bristol
Index terms: Language and Literature - Celtic, Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Middle English
Abstract

This session is the fourth of four comparative sessions on the Marches of Britain and Ireland. This fourth session will examine Marcher identities. The first paper will characterize the genealogies and chronicles commissioned by Shropshire and Herefordshire families as exceptional in their use of Geoffrey of Monmouth to make political arguments for regional dominance. The second paper will examine wax seals, heraldry, and genealogies from southeast Wales for evidence of projected self-image and border identity. The third paper rejects the notion of hybrid identity on the March and argues instead that multilingualism and code-switching were the norm in Marcher literature of the later Middle Ages.