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IMC 2023: Sessions

Session 1001: The Body in Medieval Art, I

Wednesday 5 July 2023, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Universiteit van Amsterdam
Organiser:Wendelien A. W. Van Welie-Vink, Afdeling Kunst- en cultuurwetenschappen, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Moderator/Chair:Wendelien A. W. Van Welie-Vink, Afdeling Kunst- en cultuurwetenschappen, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Paper 1001-aThe Risen Body of Lazarus: The Depiction of Jews in Albert van Ouwater's 'Raising of Lazarus'
(Language: English)
Huib Iserief, Afdeling Kunst- en cultuurwetenschappen, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Index terms: Art History - General, Art History - Painting, Hebrew and Jewish Studies
Paper 1001-bThe Impotent Body Depicted in Manuscripts of Decretum Gratiani
(Language: English)
Eric Boot, Curating Art & Cultures - Arts of the Netherlands, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Index terms: Art History - General, Art History - Painting, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1001-cThe Fallen Body: The Depiction of the Body of Lucifer
(Language: English)
Claudia Marcu, Faculteit der Geesteswetenschappen, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Index terms: Art History - General, Art History - Painting
Paper 1001-dSeducing with an Apple?: The Depiction of Eva and Her Breasts
(Language: English)
Pien Vieliers, Faculteit der Geesteswetenschappen, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Abstract

The University of Amsterdam's continuing research on the Body in medieval Art recently culminated in an exhibition in Museum Catharijneconvent, Utrecht, demonstrating its potential for further research and answering new questions. During our two sessions at IMC 2023 we will build on methods and conclusions presented at previous strands in IMC's on the Body in Medieval Art. We will present new topics within the concept of the Body.
This time we will explore new dimensions within and beyond the iconography of the body. One session will focus on the handling of the body, such as 'acting sculptures' in theatre and liturgy. The other session will discuss a variety of bodily details that provide fascinating insight into how mundane actions can be considered celestial or of celestial importance: pointing toward genitals in relation to fertility or the grasping of a nose because of a foul smell. Small bodily details and actions can have far reaching consequences for its interpretation.
Through material and iconographical art historical research we aim to provide new insights into the medieval artist and audience's perception of the body; both their own as well as the bodies they venerate or despise.