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IMC 2023: Sessions

Session 1731: Tangling with the Classics, III: Medieval Literary Culture

Thursday 6 July 2023, 14.15-15.45

Organisers:Jacqueline Burek, Department of English, George Mason University, Virginia
Rebecca Menmuir, Faculty of English University of Oxford
Moderator/Chair:Jacqueline Burek, Department of English, George Mason University, Virginia
Paper 1731-aEntangled Affinity in Medieval Irish Classical Reception
(Language: English)
Brigid Ehrmantraut, Wolfson College University of Cambridge
Index terms: Language and Literature - Celtic, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 1731-b'Muse, tell me (again) of the deeds of Alexander': Classical Reception and (Meta)poetic Entanglement in Walter of Ch√Ętillon's Alexandreis
(Language: English)
Ivo Wolsing, Independent Scholar, Amsterdam
Index terms: Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 1731-c'Let clerkis ken the poetis different': Aeneid, Book XIII in Late Medieval Scotland
(Language: English)
Laurie Atkinson, Department of English Studies, Durham University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Abstract

This panel is one of a series of panels entitled 'Tangling with the Classics' which together explore how the relationship between classical and medieval texts might be considered a kind of entanglement. These panels complicate the idea of classical reception in the Middle Ages, by reimagining it not as a linear movement but as a tangled mass of threads, in which classical authors are equally likely to ensnare or to be ensnared by medieval writers. The 'Medieval Literary Culture' panel investigates this idea in medieval literature, with papers examining networks of literary affinity between classical and Old Irish literature, the role of Old French literary culture in Walter of Ch√Ętillon's classicizing Alexandreis, and the way that continuations of the Aeneid prompted literary theorizing in late medieval Scotland.