IMC 2003: Sessions

Session 514: 'What Region May Lyve Withoute a Reule': The Practical Application of Royal Authority in Late Medieval England

Tuesday 15 July 2003, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Public Record Office/History of Parliament Trust
Organisers:Sean Cunningham, The National Archives, Kew
Malcolm Mercer, The National Archives: Public Record Office, Kew
Moderator/Chair:Linda S. Clark, History of Parliament Trust, London
Paper 514-aKing, Council and Locality: Recognisances and Regional Government during Henry VII's Reign
(Language: English)
Sean Cunningham, The National Archives, Kew
Index terms: Administration, Law, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 514-bThe Under Sheriff and Parliament in the Late 15th Century
(Language: English)
Hannes Kleineke, History of Parliament Trust, London
Index terms: Administration, Law, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 514-cFalling Foul of the Law: The Uses and Abuses of the Process of Outlawry in the 15th Century
(Language: English)
Malcolm Mercer, The National Archives: Public Record Office, Kew
Index terms: Administration, Law, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

How did the crown control the effectiveness of local government in England during the late Middle Ages? The relationship of centre and locality, and the practical application of the law, are much-debated subjects, still dominated by ideas of the quality of lordship at different social levels. This session aims to show that established mechanisms and personnel of central government were vital to the projection of royal authority into the regions. The emphasis will be on the documents themselves and the ways in which the information they contain can be interpreted.