IMC 2008: Sessions

Session 310: Approaching the Byzantine Family, III: Marriage, Work, and the Late Family

Monday 7 July 2008, 16.30-18.00

Organisers:Leslie Brubaker, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Archaeology, University of Birmingham / Institute of Archaeology & Antiquity, University of Birmingham
Margaret E. Mullett, Institute of Byzantine Studies, Queen's University, Belfast
Shaun Tougher, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Moderator/Chair:Margaret E. Mullett, Institute of Byzantine Studies, Queen's University, Belfast
Paper 310-aThe Importance of Marriage to Byzantine Families
(Language: English)
Jamie Lloyd, Institute of Archaeology & Antiquity, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 310-bWorking Together: The Role of the Family in Middle Byzantine Textile Production
(Language: English)
Julia Galliker, Institute of Archaeology & Antiquity, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Daily Life, Social History
Paper 310-cThe Emancipation of the Next Generation: Changes in the Structure and Wealth of the Late Byzantine Family
(Language: English)
Fotini Kondyli, Institute of Archaeology & Antiquity, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Byzantine Studies, Demography, Social History
Abstract

The third session of ‘Approaching the Byzantine Family’ focuses on marriage, industry, and late peasant families. Jamie Lloyd studies marriage in general but also marriage in the imperial family. Jamie will exlpore why marriage to ‘outsiders’ or ‘foreigners’ was forbidden by the Book of Ceremonies. Julia Galliker will examine the role of the family in textile production. The social identity and family structure of the textile workers is analysed, particularly with respect to slavery. Fotini Kondyli draws on the monastic archives for the island of Lemnos, and aims to study the family structure and the changes it experienced in the 14th and 15th centuries.