IMC 2008: Sessions

Session 615: Problems with Plant Names

Tuesday 8 July 2008, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Department of English Language, University of Glasgow
Organiser:Carole Biggam, Department of English Language, University of Glasgow
Moderator/Chair:Graham D. Caie, School of Critical Studies (English Language), University of Glasgow
Paper 615-aEntering the Jungle: The Nature of Plant-Names
(Language: English)
Carole Biggam, Department of English Language, University of Glasgow
Paper 615-bSome Problematic Plant-Names: Elehtre and Galluc, A Reconsideration
(Language: English)
Maria A. D'Aronco, Dipartimento di Lingue & Letterature Germaniche & Romanze, Università di Udine
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Medicine
Paper 615-c'My Sigurðr was to the sons of Gjúki as is garlic growing up from grass': Why Were Medieval Germanic Speakers So Passionate about Alliums?
(Language: English)
Alaric Hall, Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Pagan Religions
Abstract

The session tackles some puzzling plant names in Old English and Old Norse. D’Aronco considers the meaning of elehtre and galluc as examples of how the Anglo-Saxons coped with translating Latin plant names in Old English medical texts, and Hall considers why Germanic-speaking cultures were so interested in alliums (plants such as garlic), ranging widely through runic inscriptions, Scandinavian literature, and Anglo-Saxon medicine.