IMC 2009: Sessions

Session 1620: From Funerary Feasts to the Stake: The Changing Face of Spiritual Acceptability in the West

Thursday 16 July 2009, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:University of Glasgow
Organiser:Jennifer Boyle, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Moderator/Chair:Marilyn Dunn, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Paper 1620-aChristianization and Compromise: The Shifting Nature of the Relationship between the Living and the Dead
(Language: English)
Jennifer Boyle, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Index terms: Daily Life, Ecclesiastical History, Religious Life, Theology
Paper 1620-bToo Close, Too Soon, Too Feminine: The Abortive Genesis of Insular Women's Vision Literature
(Language: English)
Joanna Royle, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Gender Studies, Religious Life, Theology
Paper 1620-cWould Dolcino's Apostolic Brethren Ever Have Been Orthodox?
(Language: English)
Elizabeth Timberlake-Newell, University of Glasgow
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Religious Life, Theology
Abstract

From the basic requirements of the conversion period, through varying responses to visions in the High Middle Ages, to the strict rules that framed heretical dissent in the 14th century, the behavioural expectations of the church about her congregants underwent great change over the Middle Ages. The ways in which these differing expectations were not met by popular cooperation also shifted across time and place, and, in some cases, fringe practices were subsequently brought into the church fold. By considering three examples of spiritual behaviour that would become mainstream elsewhere and at other times, it is possible to reflect on the fluid boundaries of orthodoxy and the situated nature of spiritual acceptability amongst the faithful.