IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 1226: Bad, Drunken, and Ridiculed: Perceptions and Portrayals of Danish Knights in the 12th-13th Centuries

Wednesday 11 July 2012, 14.15-15.45

Organiser:Kerstin Hundahl, Department of History, Københavns Universitet
Moderator/Chair:Michael H. Gelting, Centre for Scandinavian Studies King's College University of Aberdeen 24 High Street OLD ABERDEEN AB24 3EB
Paper 1226-aDrunken Danish Knights: Drunkenness a Marker of Danish Ethnicity?
(Language: English)
Kasper H. Andersen, Department of History & Area Studies, Aarhus Universitet
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Mentalities, Military History, Social History
Paper 1226-b'Disgracefully Killed by Woman': Jaromar II, a Faithless Danish Vassal or Just a Bad Knight?
(Language: English)
Kerstin Hundahl, Department of History, Københavns Universitet
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Mentalities, Military History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1226-c'Not Exactly Unchivalrous... But Still Behaviour to be Ridiculed and Snickered At': On the Heraldic Consequences of Breaking Certain Unwritten Rules
(Language: English)
Steffen Harpsøe, Rigsarkivet (Danish National Archives), Statens Arkiver, København
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Art History - General, Heraldry, Social History
Abstract

Chivalry and knighthood is not a characteristic ordinarily associated with Danish warriors or knights of the 12th and 13th centuries, and unlike other kingdoms no mirror for the knightly ideal was ever produced. Nonetheless the behaviour of some knights was so extreme that it generated a response by contemporaries giving an outline for when the rules had been broken or divergence occurred. In some cases the portrayal of the conduct or personality of these knights was then echoed in later centuries. This session aims to explore how contemporary sources perceived and responded when knights failed to follow the rules.