IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 129: Glossed Manuscripts in the Early Middle Ages: An Exploration of Their Form, Function, and Content

Monday 9 July 2012, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Mariken Teeuwen, Huygens ING, Koninklijke Nederlandse Academie van Wetenschappen, Den Haag
Moderator/Chair:Irene van Renswoude, Huygens Instituut voor Nederlandse Geschiedenis, Koninklijke Nederlandse Academie van Wetenschappen, Den Haag
Paper 129-aGlosses in All Shapes and Sizes: What Does Form Say about Function?
(Language: English)
Mariken Teeuwen, Huygens ING, Koninklijke Nederlandse Academie van Wetenschappen, Den Haag
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 129-bMarginalia in the Spotlight: A Quantitative Analysis of Annotated Manuscripts Exemplified by the Digital Collection of the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek Munich
(Language: English)
Evina Steinov√°, Universiteit Utrecht is Ingeschreven
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 129-cThe Study of Virgil's Works in the 9th Century
(Language: English)
Silvia Ottaviano, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa
Carmela Cioffi, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Latin-Latin gloss traditions have long been a neglected area of research, for several reasons. They are difficult to access, not only because of their tiny script and existence in the margin, the most fragile part of the book, but also because of their fuzzy contours, allowing for more variations from manuscript to manuscript than traditional textual scholarship can handle. Moreover, the traditional view on these texts was that they belonged to the context of the school, and that their function did not go further than to explain the main text at hand. Now that a few gloss traditions have been published, however, it becomes clear that their form and function is much more complicated than that. It has been shown that, in some cases, they do not only explain the text at hand, but also go beyond it, by referring to other texts, comparing authorities and discussing their differences. The margin, so it seems, was an excellent place for debate and dissent. The three papers in this session will analyse various aspects of early medieval manuscripts with glosses, in order to get a better grip on the phenomenon and analyse the role of marginal texts in the circulation of knowledge in early medieval Europe.