IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 1301: Regulating Society in Anglo-Saxon England

Wednesday 11 July 2012, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Department of English, University of Sydney
Organiser:Anna Wallace, Department of English, University of Sydney
Moderator/Chair:Louise D'Arcens, Department of English, University of Wollongong, New South Wales
Paper 1301-aShame as a Social Sanction in Anglo-Saxon England
(Language: English)
Tahlia Birnbaum, Medieval & Early Modern Centre, University of Sydney
Index terms: Daily Life, Language and Literature - Old English, Religious Life
Paper 1301-bIgnorant Clerics and Learned Monks: Byrhtferth of Ramsey's Schoolroom
(Language: English)
Anna Wallace, Department of English, University of Sydney
Index terms: Education, Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Latin, Religious Life
Paper 1301-cSocial Regulation in Andreas
(Language: English)
April Bertels-Garnsey, Department of English, University of Sydney
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Mentalities
Abstract

Anglo-Saxon literature, particularly religious texts, can be seen to offer prescriptive modes of activity. This session will explore the construction and enforcement of social rules in Anglo-Saxon literature and culture with a particular focus on the church’s relationship with the wider community. Texts to be examined include Old English poetry and homilies, the vernacular Pastoral Care, and the Old English and Latin textbook Byrhtferth’s Enchiridion. Issues under consideration include shame as a social force, the politics of education, religious obedience and obligation, and the use of literary characters to regulate behaviour.