IMC 2013: Sessions

Session 508: Byzantium in Context, I: The Meaning of (Verse) Inscriptions for Byzantine Greek and Medieval Latin Culture - Similarities and Differences

Tuesday 2 July 2013, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Abteilung Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / Institute of Historical Research, Department of Byzantine Research, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens
Organiser:Andreas Rhoby, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Abteilung Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Moderator/Chair:Andreas Rhoby, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Abteilung Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Paper 508-aCarolingian Versed Inscriptions and Images: From Aesthetics to Efficiency
(Language: English)
Vincent Debiais, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM), Université de Poitiers / Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Index terms: Art History - General, Art History - Decorative Arts, Epigraphy, Language and Literature - Italian
Paper 508-bVerses in Latin Inscriptions: From Rhythm and Rimes to Aesthetics
(Language: English)
Estelle Ingrand-Varenne, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM), Université de Poitiers / Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Index terms: Art History - General, Epigraphy, Language and Literature - Latin
Paper 508-cThe Epigraphy of the Genoise Pallio: A Reconsideration
(Language: English)
Ida Toth, Ioannou Centre for Classical & Byzantine Studies, University of Oxford
Index terms: Art History - General, Byzantine Studies, Epigraphy
Abstract

In Medieval and Byzantine Studies in recent years, specific focus has been put on the research of the relationship between text and image. The similarities and differences in epigraphic display in West and East, however, have rarely been studied together. In both cultures verse inscriptions play a specific role: they interact with accompanying images and are part of the artistic performance. In a tour from ca. 600 AD to 1300 AD the three presentations will compare Carolingian and High Medieval Ages verses with Late Byzantine inscriptions and present their specific role in the process of word-image interaction.