IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 125: Gregorian Reform / Ecclesiastical Reform: Italian Perspectives on Historiographical Traditions in Dialogue

Monday 6 July 2015, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:National Endowment for the Humanities / American Academy, Rome
Organiser:Tommaso di Carpegna Falconieri, Dipartimento di Scienze della Comunicazione e Discipline Umanistiche, Università degli Studi di Urbino 'Carlo Bo'
Moderator/Chair:John Howe, Department of History, Texas Tech University
Paper 125-aThe Origin and Present Uses of the Concept of 'Gregorian Reform'
(Language: English)
Tommaso di Carpegna Falconieri, Dipartimento di Scienze della Comunicazione e Discipline Umanistiche, Università degli Studi di Urbino 'Carlo Bo'
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Political Thought
Paper 125-bShared Symbols, Individual Meanings: Giovanni Miccoli on the Hermeneutical Diversity and Dynamism of Thought among the 'Gregorians'
(Language: English)
William L. North, Department of History, Carleton College, Minnesota
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Political Thought
Paper 125-cThe Reform of the Church in the 11th Century: A Concept That Belongs in the Plural
(Language: English)
Umberto Longo, Dipartimento di Storia Culture Religioni, Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza'
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Political Thought
Abstract

The concept of ‘the Gregorian Reform’, as conceived about a century ago and still in use, interprets the various currents of ecclesiastical reform emerging between the 1040s and 1120s as a unitary project which, after a period of preparation, found its execution and full realization under Gregory VII (1073-1085). These presentations place this reading in dialogue with an alternative interpretation – advanced chiefly by Italian, German, and American historians – that understands reform as a complex, polyvalent phenomenon. Multi-directional and influenced by many individuals – distinct in their interests, experiences, and ideals – only with time and struggle did the reform reach any eventual synthesis.