IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 140: Journeys in Manuscript Studies at the University of Manchester

Monday 6 July 2015, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester
Organiser:Marci Freedman, School of Arts, Languages & Cultures, University of Manchester
Moderator/Chair:Charles Insley, John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester
Paper 140-a'Branching Out': Meaning and Metaphor in the Arbor Caritatis et Misericordiae (John Rylands Library, MS Lat 18)
(Language: English)
Irene A. O'Daly, John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester
Index terms: Biblical Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 140-bFlores historiarum (Chetham's Library, MS 6712) and Regional Manuscript Production
(Language: English)
Jessica Coatesworth, School of Arts, Languages & Cultures, University of Manchester
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Monasticism
Paper 140-cReading Benjamin: The Medieval Reception of Benjamin of Tudela's Book of Travels
(Language: English)
Marci Freedman, School of Arts, Languages & Cultures, University of Manchester
Index terms: Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

The purpose of this panel is to showcase manuscript research currently taking place in Manchester. Working with manuscripts from the 12th to 14th centuries, with a particular focus on miscellanies and rolls, the three papers will highlight different approaches to manuscript studies. First, ‘Branching Out’: Meaning and Metaphor in the Arbor Caritatis et Misericordiae (John Rylands Library, MS Lat 18) will discuss the interplay of text and biblical imagery in a 14th-century tree diagram. Second, ‘Flores historiarum (Chetham’s Library, MS 6712) and Regional Manuscript Production’ will demonstrate how physical characteristics can be used to establish manuscript transmission and dissemination. Finally, ‘Reading Benjamin: The Medieval Reception of Benjamin of Tudela’s Book of Travels‘ moves beyond an intra-textual examination of the narrative to discuss how reception can offer insights into a text’s transmission. Using Manchester-based sources, the papers will showcase both the world-class collections and the vibrant research community in Manchester.