IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 222: Endowments, Renewal, and Reform, II: External Renewal

Monday 6 July 2015, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:European Research Council Project 'FOUNDMED - Foundations in Medieval Societies: Cross-Cultural Comparisons'
Organiser:Zachary Chitwood, European Research Council Project 'FOUNDMED - Foundations in Medieval Societies: Cross-Cultural Comparisons', Humboldt Universität, Berlin
Moderator/Chair:Annette Schmiedchen, Seminar für Indologie, Martin-Luther-Universität, Halle-Wittenberg
Paper 222-aRefounding Monasteries and Dynastic Rivalry on Mount Athos in the Late Middle Ages, 13th-15th Centuries
(Language: English)
Zachary Chitwood, European Research Council Project 'FOUNDMED - Foundations in Medieval Societies: Cross-Cultural Comparisons', Humboldt Universität, Berlin
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Monasticism
Paper 222-bSocial Differences as a Cause for the Appearance of New Foundation-Types in Medieval Jewish Communities
(Language: English)
Emese Kozma, Institut für Geschichtswissenschaften, Humboldt Universität, Berlin
Index terms: Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Religious Life
Paper 222-cPious Endowments as Instruments for Religious Reformation and Dynastic Legitimation in the Ayyubid and Mamluk Periods
(Language: English)
Ignacio Sánchez, Classics & Ancient History, University of Warwick
Index terms: Islamic and Arabic Studies, Religious Life
Abstract

Although founders in the various cultures of the Middle Ages from Iceland to India almost invariably prescribed that their endowments should last forever, renewal and reform were constantly required to overcome existential threats (confiscations by the religious and secular authorities, impoverishment of the endowment, etc.) in the course of an endowment’s history. In these sessions researchers from a variety of different fields examine not only how endowments were reformed and renewed internally in markedly differing contexts (Session I), but also how endowments themselves became instruments of external renewal (Session II), for instance as tools of dynastic legitimation.