IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1010: Broken Books: Tracing Liturgical Manuscripts from Medieval Sweden

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:National Library of Finland, Helsinki
Organiser:Jaakko Tahkokallio, National Library of Finland, University of Helsinki
Moderator/Chair:Jaakko Tahkokallio, National Library of Finland, University of Helsinki
Paper 1010-aEnglish, German, and French Liturgical Influences in the Chant Books of Medieval Sweden
(Language: English)
Sean Dunnahoe, Department of Music, Royal Holloway, University of London
Sean Dunnahoe, Department of Music, Royal Holloway, University of London
Index terms: Liturgy, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Music
Paper 1010-bLiturgical Variation and the Localisation of Swedish Missal Fragments of the Late 14th and Early 15th Centuries
(Language: English)
Lauri Hirvonen, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture & Arts Studies, University of Helsinki
Lauri Hirvonen, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture & Arts Studies, University of Helsinki
Index terms: Liturgy, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Paper 1010-c16th-Century Recycling as a Clue to the Medieval Provenance: Understanding Early Modern Bureaucrats
(Language: English)
Seppo Eskola, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture & Art Studies, University of Helsinki
Seppo Eskola, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture & Art Studies, University of Helsinki
Index terms: Administration, Economics - General, Liturgy, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

In post-Reformation Sweden, the Crown re-used leaves from obsolete liturgical books as covers for its tax records on a massive scale. This centralised process preserved a unique and random sampling of the books of the parish churches – manuscripts that were once everywhere but survive poorly all over Europe. However, lack of knowledge on where these now fragmentary books came from seriously hinders their use as historical sources. The presentations of this session provide new light on the origins and provenances of groups of Swedish book fragments (12th-15th centuries), combining codicological and liturgical analysis with detective work on the early modern administrative notes found in them.