IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1111: Carolingian Local Priests, II: Local Manuscripts, Local Knowledge

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Carine van Rhijn, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Moderator/Chair:Steffen Patzold, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Paper 1111-aWhat Did Carolingian Local Priests Know (or Not)?: Some Reflections on a Letter Sent by Raban Maur to the Priest Regimboldus, c. 850
(Language: English)
Charles Mériaux, Institut de Recherches Historiques du Septentrion (IRHiS - UMR 8529), Université Charles-de-Gaulle - Lille 3
Charles Mériaux, Institut de Recherches Historiques du Septentrion (IRHiS - UMR 8529), Université Charles-de-Gaulle - Lille 3
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Local History
Paper 1111-b'Instruction-Readers for Priests': Books for Educating Carolingian Local Priests
(Language: English)
Monika Wenz, Graduiertenkolleg 1662 'Religiöses Wissen im vormodernen Europa (800–1800)', Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Monika Wenz, Graduiertenkolleg 1662 'Religiöses Wissen im vormodernen Europa (800–1800)', Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1111-cPrognostic Texts for Local Pastoral Care?: The Case of MS El Escorial L III 8
(Language: English)
Carine van Rhijn, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Carine van Rhijn, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Building on the first session, this second one will focus on what local priests knew. They were (or were expected to be), after all, the local experts of Christianity in the widest sense, as well as those who linked the world of bishops and kings to that of the rural population. What we can know about their level of education and know-how is based to a large extent on the manuscripts used by local priests, as well as various forms of communication with their bishops. These sources will take centre stage in order to show how new research opens up a world of local knowledge that sheds new light on the ‘micro-Christendoms’ of the Carolingian period.