IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1204: Violence, Conflict, and Negotiation in Medieval Ireland and Britain, I: Invasion, Bureaucracy, and the Law

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Medieval History Research Centre, Trinity College Dublin
Organiser:Áine Foley, Medieval History Research Centre, Trinity College Dublin
Moderator/Chair:Stephen Church, School of History, University of East Anglia
Paper 1204-aRecalling the Invasion in Late Medieval Ireland
(Language: English)
Caoimhe Whelan, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin
Caoimhe Whelan, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin
Caoimhe Whelan, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1204-bLordship and Empire: Conflicting Patterns of English Rule in 13th-Century Ireland
(Language: English)
Colin Veach, Department of History, University of Hull
Colin Veach, Department of History, University of Hull
Colin Veach, Department of History, University of Hull
Index terms: Military History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1204-cHibernica, Anglica, or Other?: The Experiences of Free Gaelic Women in English Royal Courts in Ireland, 1252-1327
(Language: English)
Stephen Hewer, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin
Stephen Hewer, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin
Stephen Hewer, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin
Index terms: Gender Studies, Law, Women's Studies
Abstract

The first paper will look at how the 12th-century invasion of Ireland was remembered in the late medieval period, and evaluate how perceptions of the armed invasion reflected and coincided with the contemporary concerns of colonists. The second paper will examine how English administration and bureaucracy were introduced into post-invasion Ireland, and the conflict and negotiation that was at the heart of English rule in 13th-century Ireland. The final paper will challenge previous historiography on women in high medieval Ireland, which rests upon the claim that all Gaelic women were denied legal redress in English courts. The court records contradict these claims and reveals a variegated and nuanced society that included some Gaelic women and excluded certain Englishwomen.