IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1637: Crossing Cultural and Religious Boundaries, II: Exchange and Conflict in the Eastern Mediterranean and Cyprus

Thursday 7 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:University of Edinburgh
Organiser:Michael Carr, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Moderator/Chair:Gianluca Raccagni, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Paper 1637-aL'art roman en Chypre?: 'Crusader' Romanesque Sculpture in Lusignan Cyprus
(Language: English)
Michalis Olympios, Department of History & Archaeology, University of Cyprus, Nicosia
Michalis Olympios, Department of History & Archaeology, University of Cyprus, Nicosia
Index terms: Art History - General, Art History - Sculpture, Crusades, Economics - Trade
Paper 1637-bGenoese-Mamluk Relations: The 1290 Treaty and Its Impact on Christian-Muslim Relations
(Language: English)
Olivier Berrou, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Olivier Berrou, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Index terms: Crusades, Economics - Trade, Maritime and Naval Studies, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1637-cBetween Profit, Politics, and Piracy: The Use of Slaves by the Knights Hospitaller and Its Effects on Their Position in Cyprus and Malta
(Language: English)
Nicholas McDermott, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Nicholas McDermott, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Index terms: Crusades, Economics - Trade, Maritime and Naval Studies, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The aim of these sessions is to look at how individuals and institutions, both secular and religious, aimed to limit and facilitate exchange across perceived religious and cultural boundaries in three different contested zones in Europe and the Near East. This session will focus on interactions between Franks, Greeks, Hospitallers, Genoese, and Mamluks in the Levant and on Cyprus. Particular attention will be paid to the economic mechanisms created to regulate exchange in these regions; the transfer of knowledge and ideas (e.g. artistic styles); the importance of sustaining transcultural trade routes and networks in the face of military and political pressures (e.g. those of slaves); and the tensions created by the desire for maritime and/or land-based commercial dominance.