IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1733: Writing Women's Letters, III: Intimacy and Agency in the Cloister

Thursday 7 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Epistolae: Medieval Women's Letters Database
Organisers:Kathryn Maude, Centre for Late Antique & Medieval Studies, King's College London
Steven Watts, School of History, University of St Andrews
Moderator/Chair:Steven Watts, School of History, University of St Andrews
Paper 1733-aMigratory Feelings in the Boniface Correspondence
(Language: English)
Diane Watt, School of Literature & Languages, University of Surrey
Diane Watt, School of Literature & Languages, University of Surrey
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Gender Studies, Religious Life, Women's Studies
Paper 1733-bFrom Anonymity to a New Identity: A 12th-Century Letter to a Nun and Its Hagiographic Afterlife
(Language: English)
Anne Clark, Department of Religion, University of Vermont
Anne Clark, Department of Religion, University of Vermont
Index terms: Gender Studies, Hagiography, Language and Literature - Latin, Women's Studies
Paper 1733-cLetters, Papal Bulls, and Women's Agency
(Language: English)
Kathryn Maude, Centre for Late Antique & Medieval Studies, King's College London
Kathryn Maude, Centre for Late Antique & Medieval Studies, King's College London
Kirsty Day, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
Kirsty Day, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
Index terms: Gender Studies, Hagiography, Religious Life, Women's Studies
Abstract

This is the third panel in a series about letters to and from women in the Middle Ages. Sponsored by the Epistolae database of women’s letters, the three panels bring together scholars from Europe, North America, and Australasia to provide a survey of current research on women’s epistolary traditions and discuss innovative approaches to the field. This panel concentrates on women religious, with papers on emotional vocabulary in Anglo-Saxon nuns’ letters, the hagiographical afterlife of a letter by Arnulf of Lisieux, and women’s agency in letters and papal bulls from England and Eastern Europe.