IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 318: Lenten Sermons: Fast of the Body, Banquet of the Soul, III - Spiritual Meaning of Fasting

Monday 4 July 2016, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:International Medieval Sermon Studies Society (IMSSS)
Organiser:Pietro Delcorno, Leeds Humanities Research Institute / School of Languages, Cultures & Societies - Italian, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Lorenza Tromboni, Dipartimento di Storia, Archeologia, Geografia, Arte e Spettacolo, Università di Firenze
Paper 318-a'Where is the Man who Fasted from what is Forbidden and Feasted on what is Permitted?': The Ramadan Sermons of the Sufi Preacher Shu'ayb al-Hurayfish
(Language: English)
Linda G. Jones, Departamento de Humanidades, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
Linda G. Jones, Departamento de Humanidades, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
Linda G. Jones, Departamento de Humanidades, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
Index terms: Islamic and Arabic Studies, Language and Literature - Other, Rhetoric, Sermons and Preaching
Paper 318-b'Praeceptum ieiunii': A Spiritual Reading of Nicholas of Cusa's Lenten Sermons
(Language: English)
Coralba Colomba, Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici, Università del Salento, Lecce
Coralba Colomba, Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici, Università del Salento, Lecce
Coralba Colomba, Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici, Università del Salento, Lecce
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Philosophy, Sermons and Preaching, Theology
Abstract

In the intention of the Church, Lent was not only a period of strict fasting of the body but was also meant to provide the faithful with a rich banquet of religious and moral teachings that would instruct, reinvigorate, and refresh the soul. Preaching was the primary form of religious instruction to invite the faithful to this rich spiritual nourishment. This third session investigates the spiritual meaning of fasting in sermons and how metaphors of food served to express the hunger for God. Moreover, by considering both Lenten and Ramadan preaching, this session aims to compare different, yet communicating religious traditions.