IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 509: Cities of Readers, I: Spaces and Places of Religious Knowledge

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Project 'Cities of Readers', Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Organiser:Sabrina Corbellini, Oudere Nederlandse Letterkunde Rijksuniversiteit Groningen Oude Kijk in 't Jatstraat 26 9712 EK GRONINGEN
Moderator/Chair:Bart Ramakers, Oudere Nederlandse Letterkunde, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Paper 509-aDomestic Religion and Religious Instruction in the Late Medieval Household in Northern France
(Language: English)
Margriet Hoogvliet, Afdeling Geschiedenis, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Margriet Hoogvliet, Afdeling Geschiedenis, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Index terms: Daily Life, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Lay Piety, Religious Life
Paper 509-bSanctifying Domestic Space: Religious Reading Instructions for a 15th-Century Dutch Laywoman
(Language: English)
Susanne de Jong, Oudere Nederlandse Letterkunde, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Susanne de Jong, Oudere Nederlandse Letterkunde, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Index terms: Daily Life, Language and Literature - Dutch, Lay Piety, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 509-cMartin Waldseemüller's Universalis Cosmographia: A Worldwide View on the Space of Religion at the End of the Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Angelo Cattaneo, Centro de História de Além-Mar (CHAM), Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Angelo Cattaneo, Centro de História de Além-Mar (CHAM), Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Index terms: Mentalities, Pagan Religions, Religious Life
Abstract

The research project ‘Cities of Readers: Religious Literacies in the Long Fifteenth Century’ aims at reconstructing the impact and the diffusion of religious readership and the making of religious knowledge among lay believers and to study their active role in this process. This session will focus in particular on the study of spaces and places of religious knowledge. The papers, ranging from domestic devotion in late medieval France and the Low Countries to Martin Waldseemüller’s Universalis Cosmographia, discuss the possibilities and the consequences of a spatial approach to late medieval religious manifestations in a wide chronological and geographical framework.