IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 705: Global Byzantium: Transitional Relations, 500-1453, III

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Archaeology, University of Birmingham
Organiser:Anna C. Kelley, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Archaeology, University of Birmingham
Moderator/Chair:Arietta S. Papaconstantinou, Centre de Recherche d'Histoire et Civilisation de Byzance, Université de Paris I - Panthéon-Sorbonne
Paper 705-aWaves and Footprints in a Cultural Exchange between Byzantium and Egypt
(Language: English)
Eunice Dauterman Maguire, Department of the History of Art, Johns Hopkins University
Eunice Dauterman Maguire, Department of the History of Art, Johns Hopkins University
Index terms: Art History - Decorative Arts, Byzantine Studies
Paper 705-bA Long-Distance Relationship: The Patriarchate of Jerusalem and the Medieval West, 800-1099
(Language: English)
Daniel K. Reynolds, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham
Daniel K. Reynolds, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 705-cMosaics from Sicily and Venice: Greek Inscriptions, Latin Artists
(Language: English)
Henry Maguire, Department of the History of Art, Johns Hopkins University / School of History & Cultures, University of Birmingham
Henry Maguire, Department of the History of Art, Johns Hopkins University / School of History & Cultures, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Art History - Decorative Arts, Byzantine Studies
Abstract

This is the third of four related panels. Byzantine relations with the states and nations that encircled the empire are a familiar topic of discussion and debate.  But Byzantium’s geographical position and established political and economic networks meant that the empire was the central lynchpin for a complex and global web of transnational relationships as well. Byzantium linked the Vikings and Rus in the north; the Catholic lands of Europe and (after the mid-8th century) the Umayyad caliphate of al Andalus to the west; Abbasid and then Fatimid Egypt and the North African coast to the south (with tentacles reaching down the Nile to Ethiopia and through the Sahara to the Niger valley); and, to the east, Palestine, the caliphates of Damascus and then Baghdad, across the Sinai and Arabian peninsulas to the Indian Ocean and, along the so-called Silk Routes, China. These transnational relations manifested themselves in many ways, among others: economic links through trade routes; military and political links through conflict or diplomacy; and cultural links through the social mobility promoted by economic opportunity and transferrable expertise (the classic sub-field of transnational studies in contemporary history, which is however only part of the field as a whole).  With a few notable exceptions, however, Byzantine transnational relations have been little discussed, and never compared.