IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 301: New Approaches to a Climate History of the 13th and 14th Century: Tipping Points and Extreme Events

Monday 2 July 2018, 16.30-18.00

Organiser:Martin Bauch, Leibniz-Institut für Geschichte und Kultur des östlichen Europa, Leipzig
Moderator/Chair:Chantal Camenisch, Historisches Institut, Universität Bern
Paper 1311-aThe Onset of the Little Ice Age in 14th-Century Central Europe: Evidence from Narrative Sources and Deliberations about the Utility of Other Source Types
(Language: English)
Annabell Engel, Leibniz-Institut für Geschichte und Kultur des östlichen Europa, Leipzig
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Charters and Diplomatics, Daily Life, Social History
Paper 1311-bEconomic and Social Impact of Climate in Northern Alpine Regions, c. 1280-1330
(Language: English)
Thomas Labbé, Archéologie, Terre, Histoire, Sociétés (ARTEHIS - UMR 6298), Université de Bourgogne
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Daily Life, Economics - Rural, Social History
Paper 1311-cA Decade of Flooding: Infrastructural and Institutional Responses to Extreme Precipitation in Bologna between 1309 and 1321
(Language: English)
Martin Bauch, Leibniz-Institut für Geschichte und Kultur des östlichen Europa, Leipzig
Index terms: Administration, Local History, Social History, Technology
Abstract

The decades around 1300 have been traditionally regarded as a watershed in the climate history of Medieval Europe: The end of the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the onset of the Little Ice Age, be it gradually or abrupt, have been located and connected with well researched events like the Great Famine of 1315-1321 in Western Europe. The session aims to shed light on this period of transition for regions that have been less well researched. Furthermore, narrative sources are not the only possible way to explore late medieval climate change, as administrative archival sources and charters demonstrate impressively.