IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 107: England and Scotland at Peace and War in the Later Middle Ages, I

Monday 1 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Organisers:Claire Etty, Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford University Press
Andy King, Department of History, University of Southampton
Moderator/Chair:Andy King, Department of History, University of Southampton
Paper 107-aThe Ritual Landscapes of Warfare in England and Scotland, c. 1300-1500: A Comparative Perspective
(Language: English)
Beatrice Widell, Department of Archaeology, University of Reading
Beatrice Widell, Department of Archaeology, University of Reading
Beatrice Widell, Department of Archaeology, University of Reading
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Military History, Religious Life
Paper 107-bA Decade of Clerical Opposition: Episcopal Nominations to St Andrews, 1332-1342
(Language: English)
Jennifer McHugh, Department of History, Lancaster University
Jennifer McHugh, Department of History, Lancaster University
Jennifer McHugh, Department of History, Lancaster University
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 107-cThe Cult of St Ninian and Anglo-Scottish War, c. 1400: The Evidence of the Scottish Legendary
(Language: English)
Stephen Boardman, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Stephen Boardman, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Stephen Boardman, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Index terms: Hagiography, Military History
Abstract

This strand of three sessions will examine various aspects of Anglo-Scottish relations from the 13th to the 16th centuries, discussing how interactions between Englishmen and Scots, and their perceptions of each other, were shaped by a period of peaceful co-existence followed by intermittent but persistent hostilities. This first session will cover various religious and ecclesiastical aspects of Anglo-Scottish conflict, including the relationship between war, religion, and the landscape; the ecclesiastical and diplomatic repercussions of the attempts to impose an English candidate on the bishopric of St Andrews; and Scottish hagiography as a source for Anglo-Scottish warfare.