IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1126: Materiality of Manuscripts, II: Production of the Medieval Book

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Den Arnamagnæanske Samling, Københavns Universitet
Organisers:Katarzyna Anna Kapitan, Den Arnamagnæanske Samling, Københavns Universitet
N Yavuz, Den Arnamagnæanske Samling, Københavns Universitet
Moderator/Chair:N Yavuz, Den Arnamagnæanske Samling, Københavns Universitet
Paper 1126-aShining Light on the Past: Pigments in Medieval Manuscripts
(Language: English)
Louise Garner, Centre for Visual Arts & Cultures, Durham University
Louise Garner, Centre for Visual Arts & Cultures, Durham University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Science
Paper 1126-bA Low German Fragment of Saint Birgitta's Revelaciones in the Arnamagnæan Collection
(Language: English)
Tom Lorenz, Institut für Skandinavistik, Frisistik und Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft (ISFAS), Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel
Tom Lorenz, Institut für Skandinavistik, Frisistik und Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft (ISFAS), Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel
Index terms: Language and Literature - German, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1126-cThe Quire Signatures of the Codex Holmiensis D 3
(Language: English)
Agnieszka Backman, Institutionen för nordiska språk, Uppsala Universitet
Agnieszka Backman, Institutionen för nordiska språk, Uppsala Universitet
Index terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1126-dSame Manuscript, Different Reading: The Making and Remaking of a Saga Book
(Language: English)
Katarzyna Anna Kapitan, Den Arnamagnæanske Samling, Københavns Universitet
Katarzyna Anna Kapitan, Den Arnamagnæanske Samling, Københavns Universitet
Index terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Bringing together scholars working in diverse fields of medieval studies, these four sessions explore the manuscript book as an artefact and consider texts as material objects shaped and reshaped through human agency.

The second session focuses on different aspects of the production of manuscripts in different languages and places. Garner showcases findings of non-invasive spectroscopic chemical analysis undertaken by Team Pigment from Durham and Northumbria Universities on the York Gospels, thought to have been made in Canterbury scriptoria around the year 1020. Examining the material characteristics of Copenhagen, AM 79 II α 8vo, a single damaged leaf reused as cover for another manuscript, Lorenz speculates on how the original codex might have been, where, and for whom it was produced and how it ended up in the Arnamagnæan Collection. Backman discusses the quire structure of a late 15th-century manuscript, Stockholm, Holm. D 3, and what the conflicting quire signatures mean with regard to the reproduction of the codex.Examining the physical features of Reykjavík, AM 395 fol. with a focus on its production as well as the later additions to the volume, Kapitan considers how the younger paratextual features influence the manuscript as a whole and change the reading of the texts in the volume.