IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 146: Games for Teaching, Impact, and Research, I: Commercial Games and the Middle Ages

Monday 1 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:The Public Medievalist
Organiser:Robert Houghton, Department of History, University of Winchester
Moderator/Chair:Robert Houghton, Department of History, University of Winchester
Paper 146-aDeclaiming Dragons: Empathy Learning and Skyrim in Teaching Medieval Rhetorical Schemes
(Language: English)
David DeVine, Department of English, Arizona State University
David DeVine, Department of English, Arizona State University
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Teaching the Middle Ages
Paper 146-bMedieval Games and Modern Gamers: Using Tafl and Video Games in Medieval Classes
(Language: English)
James Neel, Department of English, Arizona State University
James Neel, Department of English, Arizona State University
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Teaching the Middle Ages
Paper 146-cPlaying Crusaders: Bridging the Gap Between Popular and Academic Perceptions of the Crusades in the University
(Language: English)
Mike Horswell, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Mike Horswell, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Index terms: Crusades, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Teaching the Middle Ages
Abstract

The Learning and Teaching potential of historical physical and digital games is increasingly undeniable at every level of study. These games can provide a foundation of information through their stories and worlds. They can foster understanding of complex systems through their mechanics and rules. Their very nature requires the player to learn to progress. The papers in this session consider the potential impact of free or commercially available games on students’ formative learning and present different teaching approaches using such games. They provide reports of the use of these games in practice and their impact in the classroom.