IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1651: Updating the Knight, II: Identity, Status, and Materialisation

Thursday 4 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Sonderforschungsbereich 1070 'RessourcenKulturen', Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Organiser:Jonas Froehlich, Sonderforschungsbereich 1070 'RessourcenKulturen', Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Moderator/Chair:Mario Damen, Capaciteitsgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Paper 1651-aThe Knight and the Warrior: Milites in 12th-Century Chronicles
(Language: English)
Uwe Grupp, Promotionsverbund Burg und Adel, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Uwe Grupp, Promotionsverbund Burg und Adel, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Uwe Grupp, Promotionsverbund Burg und Adel, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Index terms: Military History, Social History
Paper 1651-bKnights and Castles?: Reconsidering a Popular Relation through German Examples
(Language: English)
Jonas Froehlich, Sonderforschungsbereich 1070 'RessourcenKulturen', Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Jonas Froehlich, Sonderforschungsbereich 1070 'RessourcenKulturen', Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Jonas Froehlich, Sonderforschungsbereich 1070 'RessourcenKulturen', Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Index terms: Military History, Social History
Paper 1651-cKnighthood and Identity in the Late Medieval Town: Nuremberg in the 15th Century
(Language: English)
Ben Pope, John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester
Ben Pope, John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester
Ben Pope, John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester
Index terms: Military History, Social History
Abstract

In academic debate chivalry is often reduced to a catalogue of moral values that came into existence during the shift from the Early to the High Middle Ages. However, the life of knights was much more complex. This second session incorporates the physical and juridical materialisations of knighthood into the discussion. Focusing on castles, supposedly the most visible expression of ‘chivalry life’, and the all time favourite question of social and juridical distinctness of knights, this session looks at the development of knightly status and identity in the High and Late Middle Ages. This session leads to a core set of concepts to be considered for future evaluations of knights throughout history.