IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 228: Linguistic Artefacts of a Physical World: Place-Names and the Materiality of Early Medieval England

Monday 1 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Institute for Name-Studies (INS), University of Nottingham
Organiser:Jessica Treacher, Institute for Name-Studies (INS), University of Nottingham
Moderator/Chair:Richard Jones, Centre for English Local History, University of Leicester
Paper 228-aAshton, Ashby, and Acton: The 'Timber Yards' of Early Medieval England?
(Language: English)
Jessica Treacher, Institute for Name-Studies (INS), University of Nottingham
Jessica Treacher, Institute for Name-Studies (INS), University of Nottingham
Index terms: Economics - General, Geography and Settlement Studies, Language and Literature - Old English, Onomastics
Paper 228-b'Baddan Byrig' Alias 'Baddan By': (Re-)Naming and Ownership of Material Space in Anglo-Scandinavian England
(Language: English)
Joshua Neal, Institute for Name-Studies (INS), University of Nottingham
Joshua Neal, Institute for Name-Studies (INS), University of Nottingham
Index terms: Geography and Settlement Studies, Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Onomastics
Paper 228-cRe-Use, Transformation, and Innovation: Place-Names and the Travel Infrastructure of Early Medieval East Anglia
(Language: English)
Eleanor Rye, Institute for Name-Studies, University of Nottingham
Eleanor Rye, Institute for Name-Studies, University of Nottingham
Index terms: Economics - General, Geography and Settlement Studies, Language and Literature - Old English, Onomastics
Abstract

Place-names are, in origin, descriptive labels of the landscape and human interaction with it. These labels, once interpreted, provide an insight into the physical landscape, its resources, and early medieval perceptions of this material space. Through analysis of place-name evidence, this session will explore the use and re-purposing of settlement sites, conservatism and innovation in travel infrastructure, and the availability of woodland resources. These topics will be analysed in the context of changes in patterns of habitation and exploitation through regional and national case-studies that span the early medieval period.