IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 727: Dead Matter: Death Matters - Written Remains

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Mittelalter und Frühneuzeit (IZMF), Universität Salzburg
Organiser:Katharina Zeppezauer-Wachauer, Mittelhochdeutsche Begriffsdatenbank (MHDBDB), Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Mittelalter und Frühneuzeit (IZMF), Universität Salzburg
Moderator/Chair:Katharina Zeppezauer-Wachauer, Mittelhochdeutsche Begriffsdatenbank (MHDBDB), Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Mittelalter und Frühneuzeit (IZMF), Universität Salzburg
Paper 727-aA Matter of Life and Death: Prognosis on the Basis of So-Called 'Death-Signs' in Medieval Medical Literature
(Language: English)
Ylva Schwinghammer, Institut für Germanistik, Universität Graz
Index terms: Language and Literature - German, Medicine
Paper 727-bNarratives of the Walking Dead
(Language: English)
Manuel Schwembacher, Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Mittelalter und Frühneuzeit (IZMF), Universität Salzburg
Index terms: Art History - Decorative Arts, Biblical Studies, Language and Literature - German, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Paper 727-c'HIC IACET HONESTVS DOMINUS': Epitaphs as a Concept of Medieval Commemoration
(Language: English)
Wolfgang Neuper, Archiv der Erzdiözese Salzburg
Index terms: Art History - Sculpture, Local History, Mentalities, Religious Life
Abstract

Among other research items, texts of all formats have always been sources for the study of medieval perceptions of mortal remains influencing past and recent reception i.e. in popular culture. Their role is not only the preservation and safekeeping of written stories but also the (re)surrection of the recorded patterns, topoi and traces of narratological manifestations as well as of (dead) persons conveyed through written tradition. This section will discuss how written materials help to create, guide, and preserve the remembrance of the Middle Ages. It bridges from insights into medieval death prognosis and death assignment based on medieval medical literature to the twilight zone of the walking dead followed by dealing with funerary monuments up to the Late Middle Ages/ Early Modern Times with focus on medieval epitaphs in the prince-archbishopric of Salzburg, Austria. Our heuristic approach leaves the canonized separation between humanities and sciences and sets out to give a synoptic picture of medieval perceptions of mortal and non-mortal remains.