Social Media

Delegates use social media as a way of sharing research knowledge with the public and allowing people who cannot attend conferences to follow and participate in discussion.

Twitter is the most common social media channel for this purpose. Users of Twitter can search for or click on any hashtag and see all tweets that include it, allowing them to follow the IMC or individual conversations related to it. They can also see every tweet posted by someone that they follow, whether it uses a hashtag or not.

This policy focuses on Twitter, but platforms such as Facebook and Instagram are also used by some researchers. The same principles apply to all social media channels used to talk about IMC 2019.

Many of our delegates tweet regularly, and you should expect other delegates to tweet about your paper unless you have expressly requested otherwise. Session organisers will be asked to contact the speakers in their session to ask if they would prefer not to be tweeted about. Moderators are asked to make this clear at the start of the session, but they may also wish to remind audiences during questions/comments to make sure latecomers are aware.

Please respect the wishes of individual speakers. If the speaker is happy for you to tweet about their paper:

  • Use the year-specific hashtag, e.g. #IMC2019, so that Twitter users can see all tweets related to the event.
  • Use the specific hashtag for your session, which will be #s followed by the number of the session, e.g. #s9999. This allows Twitter users to focus on tweets related to that session.
  • Clearly attribute the content of the tweet to the speaker and mention them by at least their surname. If they have a Twitter account and you know their Twitter handle, include their Twitter handle instead.
  • Always separate your own comments about a topic from those of the speaker or any other participants. If you quote anyone directly, use quotation marks.
  • Listen carefully to the speaker and reflect the content of the paper fairly and accurately.
  • Be respectful and constructive. Feel free to engage with the speaker’s ideas, ask questions and suggest areas of further research, but please do not tweet anything you would not be willing to say in the Q&A session after the paper. Twitter is a public forum where anyone can follow each conversation.
  • You may also decide to add to the conversation by tweeting links to relevant articles, the speaker’s presentation, their online profile or other resources. If you do, links can be shortened to fit into tweets more easily by using sites such as tinyurl.com.
  • Remember that Twitter now sets a 280-character limit, which provides more space to credit speakers fully.

Speakers may be happy for you to take photos of them or their presentations, but always ask permission first.