IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 735: Roman Classics and Latin Writing in 14th and 15th Century England and Italy

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:German Historical Institute London (GHIL)
Organiser:Bernhard Hollick, Institut für Altertumskunde, Universität zu Köln / College of Humanities, University of Exeter
Moderator/Chair:Cornelia Linde, German Historical Institute, London
Paper 735-aProsodie und Metrik bei Johannes Seguardus (John Seward)
(Language: Deutsch)
Mona Dorn, Abteilung für lateinische Philologie des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Mona Dorn, Abteilung für lateinische Philologie des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Mona Dorn, Abteilung für lateinische Philologie des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 735-bThe Classics in Thomas Brinton's Sermons
(Language: English)
Bernhard Hollick, Institut für Altertumskunde, Universität zu Köln / College of Humanities, University of Exeter
Bernhard Hollick, Institut für Altertumskunde, Universität zu Köln / College of Humanities, University of Exeter
Bernhard Hollick, Institut für Altertumskunde, Universität zu Köln / College of Humanities, University of Exeter
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Sermons and Preaching
Paper 735-cFazio degli Uberti visits Rome
(Language: English)
Maren Elisabeth Schwab, Graduiertenkolleg 2212, Universität zu Köln
Maren Elisabeth Schwab, Graduiertenkolleg 2212, Universität zu Köln
Maren Elisabeth Schwab, Graduiertenkolleg 2212, Universität zu Köln
Index terms: Language and Literature - Italian, Language and Literature - Latin, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Abstract

Roman poetry was intensively studied in England and in Italy after 1300. However, the efforts of learned clerks and lay men were aimed not only at the scholarly exploration of ancient texts; the classics, too, provided source material and inspiration for new forms of Latin writing, which went far beyond the imitation of older models. Hereby, the developments in England and Italy proceeded relatively independently; it was only in the 15th century that they began to merge on a larger scale. The aim of the session is to throw light on the use of Roman poetry by Fazio degli Uberti, Thomas Brinton, and John Seward. The papers will analyse how these authors developed their literary strategies in dialogue with Ovid, Claudian, and others, and which role medieval school traditions played in this process. This comparison of the Classical reception in different parts of Europe will add to our understanding of the many roots of Renaissance culture.