IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 746: Playing the Middle Ages, II: Pop-Culture in Games / Pop-Culture and Games

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:The Public Medievalist
Organiser:Victoria Cooper, School of English, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Simon Trafford, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Paper 746-aHistoria y Videojuegos: Representing the Middle Ages in Videogames
(Language: English)
Ignacio Medel Marchena, Historia y Videojuegos, Universidad de Murcia
Ignacio Medel Marchena, Historia y Videojuegos, Universidad de Murcia
Ignacio Medel Marchena, Historia y Videojuegos, Universidad de Murcia
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Paper 746-bPawns and Kings: Medieval Games as Narrative in the Harry Potter Books and Games
(Language: English)
Eglantine Pillet, Département d'études anglophones, Sorbonne Université, Paris
Eglantine Pillet, Département d'études anglophones, Sorbonne Université, Paris
Eglantine Pillet, Département d'études anglophones, Sorbonne Université, Paris
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Paper 746-cMatilda di Canossa and Crusader Kings II: (Papal) Warrior Princess
(Language: English)
Blair Apgar, Department of History of Art, University of York
Blair Apgar, Department of History of Art, University of York
Blair Apgar, Department of History of Art, University of York
Index terms: Art History - Sculpture, Gender Studies, Historiography - Medieval, Technology
Abstract

Digital games often lean heavily on popular culture and medievalism in their presentation of the Middle Ages. Just like any form of modern fiction media, the image of the medieval period portrayed within games is seldom based solely on historical research. Instead, their portrayals are produced from a wide range of fantastic and fictional sources and popular conceptions of the past. These range from ancient and medieval legends to more modern depictions of the period in literature and film. This session considers the symbiotic relationship between the representations of the middle ages in games and the popular understanding of the period.