IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 835: Print to the People: Vernacular Books in the Early Age of Print

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Organisers:Anna Dlabačová, Centre for the Arts in Society, Universiteit Leiden
Andrea van Leerdam, Departement Talen, Literatuur en Communicatie, Universiteit Utrecht
Moderator/Chair:Marco Mostert, Onderzoekinstituut voor Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Paper 835-aSpeaking up for One's Opinion: Truth-Tellers in Narratives in the First Printed Books
(Language: English)
Martine Veldhuizen, Onderzoekinstituut voor Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Martine Veldhuizen, Onderzoekinstituut voor Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Martine Veldhuizen, Onderzoekinstituut voor Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Dutch, Mentalities, Printing History
Paper 835-bCalendars of Shepherds in Transnational Perspective: The Many Guises of a Religious/Astrological Miscellany
(Language: English)
Andrea van Leerdam, Departement Talen, Literatuur en Communicatie, Universiteit Utrecht
Andrea van Leerdam, Departement Talen, Literatuur en Communicatie, Universiteit Utrecht
Andrea van Leerdam, Departement Talen, Literatuur en Communicatie, Universiteit Utrecht
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Lay Piety, Printing History, Science
Paper 835-cPrinted Pages, Perfect Souls: Catechesis and (Re)Formation of the Soul in the First Generation of Dutch Printed Books
(Language: English)
Anna Dlabačová, Centre for the Arts in Society, Universiteit Leiden
Anna Dlabačová, Centre for the Arts in Society, Universiteit Leiden
Anna Dlabačová, Centre for the Arts in Society, Universiteit Leiden
Index terms: Language and Literature - Dutch, Lay Piety, Printing History, Religious Life
Abstract

The advent of print in the mid-15th century made texts and images available on an unprecedented scale, to a wide and partly new audience. This session aims to explore how book producers and audiences shaped vernacular print culture at a time when boundaries between manuscript and print, Latin and vernacular, word and image, religious and secular, fiction and reality were highly fluid. Preluding an international conference on early vernacular print culture to be held in 2020 in the Netherlands, the papers analyse interplays of material, visual, and textual aspects in books containing ethical, devotional, and astrological subject matter.