IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 320: The Limits of Lyric in Medieval France

Monday 6 July 2020, 16.30-18.00

Organiser:Stefano Milonia, Studi Europei, americani e interculturali, Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza'
Moderator/Chair:Emma Campbell, Department of French Studies, University of Warwick
Paper 320-aQuoting Lyrics and Subjectivities in the Chastelaine de Vergy
(Language: English)
Sophie Marnette, Balliol College, University of Oxford
Index terms: Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 320-bBack to the Future: Temporal Boundaries in Mixed-Form Occitan Narratives
(Language: English)
Emily Kate Price, Robinson College University of Cambridge
Index terms: Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 320-cWhat Is the Effect of Borders on the Things They Constrain?
(Language: English)
William Burgwinkle, King's College, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 320-dOdysseus's Scars: Lyric Interludes and Realism in Medieval France
(Language: English)
Stefano Milonia, Studi Europei, americani e interculturali, Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza'
Index terms: Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Music
Abstract

The very essence of medieval vernacular poetry lies in its limits: constricted by artificial boundaries of rhyme and metre, a lyric finds its poetic shape. Focusing on Old French and Occitan literature, the papers of this panel analyse the boundaries and interactions between lyric and non-lyric entities. Exploring critical and philosophical approaches, the speakers tackle the problematics of subjectivity, temporality, and genre definition engendered by lyric when contained within a non-lyric context. The particular focus of these investigations is the practice of lyric insertion or quotation in narrative texts, which sews together in the space of a manuscript page different formal, linguistic and chronotropic textual entities, always leaving a trace of the seam, or perhaps a gaping wound.