IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 711: Moving Byzantium, III: Writing on the Move across Genres and Materials

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Wittgenstein-Award Project, Austrian National Research Foundation (FWF) 'Moving Byzantium: Mobility, Microstructures & Personal Agency in Byzantium', Universität Wien / Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Organisers:Claudia Rapp, Institut für Byzantinistik & Neogräzistik, Universität Wien / Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Giulia Rossetto, Institut für Byzantinistik & Neogräzistik, Universität Wien
Moderator/Chair:Ilias Nesseris, Department of History & Archaeology, University of Ioannina
Paper 711-aCaucasian Christians and the Church of Jerusalem: An Archaeological Perspective
(Language: English)
Yanina Tchekhanovets, Israel Antiquities Authority, Jerusalem
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Architecture - Religious, Byzantine Studies, Monasticism
Paper 711-bEpigraphic Habit and Migration across Early Byzantium: 7th-Century Apse Inscriptions in Santa Maria Antiqua between Rome and Egypt
(Language: English)
Arkady Avdokhin, Institute for Antiquity & Near East Studies, Russian State University of Humanities
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Epigraphy, Monasticism, Religious Life
Paper 711-cSultan on the Move: Sulaymān ibn Qutlamish in Byzantine Rhetoric of the 11th and 12th Centuries
(Language: English)
Roman Shliakhtin, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Language and Literature - Greek, Military History, Social History
Paper 711-dMoving Identity through Poetry in the 13th-Century Byzantine World
(Language: English)
Krystina Kubina, Institut für Mittelalterforschung Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften Wien
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Language and Literature - Greek, Rhetoric, Social History
Abstract

The project ‘Moving Byzantium’ highlights the role of Byzantium as a global culture and analyses the internal flexibility of Byzantine society. It aims to contribute to a re-evaluation of a society and culture that has traditionally been depicted as stiff, rigid, and encumbered by its own tradition. This will be achieved by the exploration of issues of mobility, microstructures, and personal agency. This session focuses on reflections of mobility in written evidence from epigraphy, historiography, and poetry from the Byzantine world and the Christian East between Late Antiquity and the 13th century, integrating archaeology and philological analysis.