IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1650: The Economy of Salvation

Thursday 4 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Irish Research Council
Organiser:Elaine Pereira Farrell, School of History, University College Dublin / Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Moderator/Chair:Rob Meens, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Paper 1650-aCommuting Penance in the Early Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Elaine Pereira Farrell, School of History, University College Dublin / Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Elaine Pereira Farrell, School of History, University College Dublin / Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Elaine Pereira Farrell, School of History, University College Dublin / Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Index terms: Canon Law, Ecclesiastical History, Law, Social History
Paper 1650-bManumission in Insular Penitentials
(Language: English)
Roy Flechner, School of History, University College Dublin
Roy Flechner, School of History, University College Dublin
Roy Flechner, School of History, University College Dublin
Index terms: Canon Law, Ecclesiastical History, Law, Social History
Paper 1650-cDiscipline and Freedom: Material Practices of Atonement in Early Medieval Ireland
(Language: English)
Jaqueline Bemmer, Institut für Römisches Recht und Antike Rechtsgeschichte, Universität Wien
Jaqueline Bemmer, Institut für Römisches Recht und Antike Rechtsgeschichte, Universität Wien
Jaqueline Bemmer, Institut für Römisches Recht und Antike Rechtsgeschichte, Universität Wien
Index terms: Canon Law, Ecclesiastical History, Law, Social History
Abstract

The papers in this session will concentrate on the economic aspects of early medieval penance, as reflected in the early medieval penitential literature and other normative texts. Paper A shows the practice of commuting fasts for pecuniary payments to the church, giving alms to the poor, and manumitting slaves both in the insular and Carolingian worlds. Paper B shows instances in which Irish penitentials recommend manumission as a form of commutation of penances, aiming to understand the slaves’ status after manumission and how this form of commutation sits with the general disapproval towards manumission in early Irish law. Paper C shows forms of compensation, punishment and material practices of atonement, drawing attention to what appears to have been a single early medieval Irish normative tradition, rather than a tradition divided into separate secular and ecclesiastical jurisdictions.