IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1718: Shaping Matter(s)

Thursday 4 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Institut für Realienkunde des Mittelalters und der frühen Neuzeit, Universität Salzburg, Krems
Organiser:Gabriele Schichta, Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Mittelalter und Frühneuzeit (IZMF), Universität Salzburg
Moderator/Chair:Thomas Kühtreiber, Institut für Realienkunde des Mittelalters und der frühen Neuzeit, Universität Salzburg
Paper 1718-aLasting Impressions: The Technique of Moulding in Medieval Religious Practice
(Language: English)
Thomas Kühtreiber, Institut für Realienkunde des Mittelalters und der frühen Neuzeit, Universität Salzburg
Thomas Kühtreiber, Institut für Realienkunde des Mittelalters und der frühen Neuzeit, Universität Salzburg
Thomas Kühtreiber, Institut für Realienkunde des Mittelalters und der frühen Neuzeit, Universität Salzburg
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Daily Life, Mentalities, Religious Life
Paper 1718-bSculpting Innovation: The Use of Terracotta in Architectural Decor as a Marker of Transfer Processes - The Case of Castle Neuburg am Inn, Bavaria, c. 1530
(Language: English)
Magdalena März, Fakultät für Geschichte und Kunstwissenschaft, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Magdalena März, Fakultät für Geschichte und Kunstwissenschaft, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Magdalena März, Fakultät für Geschichte und Kunstwissenschaft, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Index terms: Architecture - Secular, Art History - Sculpture
Paper 1718-cShaping Knowledge on the Early Modern Table
(Language: English)
Deborah Krohn, Bard Graduate Center, New York
Deborah Krohn, Bard Graduate Center, New York
Deborah Krohn, Bard Graduate Center, New York
Index terms: Art History - Decorative Arts, Daily Life, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Mentalities
Abstract

No other process of creative labour stands closer to the biblical creatio ex nihilo than the shaping of soft amorphous materials such as clay, wax, papier maché, or dough. By focusing on selected materials and manufacturing techniques, the papers in this session will trace the knowledge produced in the course of human-material-interaction and its generative impact on culture, especially keeping in mind the level of abstract ideas and concepts. How did those manufacturing techniques that were connected with amorphous materials in particular – like free-style modelling, casting, moulding, or embossing – undergo symbolic interpretation? And how did the symbolic knowledge coming from such interpretive practices then re-enter the creative processes? We will look at this multifaceted and highly productive reciprocal effect from the perspectives of different academic fields.